Getting organized for moving day takes a lot of time and effort, and you want to be sure that you have everything in order. Obviously, you need to have your movers scheduled and start packing up your home. But, what about all of the little things that need to be done? Do you have the small details in order, yet?

 

Many people don’t realize that utilities need to be part of their moving checklist from the beginning and that they should be taken care of pretty early on. Here are some of the things that you need to keep in mind when you’re moving utilities during the moving process.

 

Sort Out What Needs to be Turned Off and What Services Can Move With You in Advance

 

As you get started with the process of moving, you want to do some research and contact your utility companies to see what they have to say about the process. In many cases, you’ll just need to schedule your final bills to get a final meter reading and be done with it.

 

If you’re going to be transferring utilities, then you’ll provide them with your new address. They will add that address to your file. Then, they will schedule when you need to turn off your current utilities and when the utilities at your new home will be turned on (or put into your name, depending on the situation).

 

Connect with the City to See About Starting a Water/Sewer/Trash Account

 

Taking the time to set up utilities before moving into a city or town that takes care of such things for you will take a little effort. Many towns and cities have a central system of plumbing that goes underneath the city. The city or town is in charge of caring for this system. So, if a water pipe bursts on your street, the city or town will come to repair it.

 

In those cases, you also likely have a municipal trash route that you live on, and you’ll have a trash can from your locality. Garbage will be picked up on a particular day. There are even some municipalities that will have recycling bins available, either on the same day or a different one.

 

Water, sewer, and trash are typically under one bill. So, when you sign up for an account and put it under your name, the city will have a minimum cost that you’re working with. If you go over a certain threshold of water use, you may go to a different bracket where you will have to pay a bit more.

 

If you live in a rural area, it’s likely that you have some sort of septic system (instead of being connected to the main sewer line) and/or water well (instead of being connected to the main water line). These will be set up and ready to go when you move into your new place. You are also unlikely to have a trash system and may have to take your trash to the dump. In those instances, you won’t have to set up those utilities or pay extra for them.

 

Do You Have a Homeowners’ Association?

 

When you move into a neighborhood, you will learn whether or not you’re going to be affiliated with a Homeowners’ Association, or HOA. These are often “governing bodies” that help keep the neighborhood looking nice and ensuring that it’s safe.

 

In some cases, they will also be responsible for paying one large collective bill to the town or city you reside in. Your dues will then help pay for water, sewer, gas, and electricity. Your real estate agent can give you a better idea as to whether or not an HOA is in the neighborhood you’re looking at and how much you could expect to pay in monthly or yearly dues.

 

Update Your Address

 

Make sure that you have your account numbers and other pertinent information available, and then either sign onto your online account or connect directly with service professionals. Give them your new address and make sure that everything is updated with it. This includes checks and cards you may be using for payments and any other addresses associated with the card. 

 

There are a lot of different things that you need to have in order before you get your move sorted out, and your utilities are absolutely essential in that case. If you start the process as you can, you’ll find that it’s much easier to accomplish your goals. You won’t have to worry about whether or not utilities have been turned on and you can stay ahead of problems.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Why would I be able to move some utilities with me?

 

Depending on where you are and where you’re headed, utility service or two may be the same in both areas. So, many utility companies will have something in a place where you can just keep your account but use it with a different meter at a different address.

 

Can I move my electric meter?

 

No, it is illegal to move your electric meter on your own, and it’s also very dangerous. But, if you’d like to take your electric meter with you (in instances where you purchased a smart meter and other reasons), you can talk to your utility and they can assist you.

 

What type of heat is best?

 

Electric is often the most expensive, but the most convenient. The most common is natural gas, and you can also have a fireplace, woodstove, or coal stove to keep your home warm. The type of heat that is best for you is the one that matches your lifestyle and your budget.

 

Should I have my gas meter indoors?

 

Probably not. If something goes wrong with your natural gas, the chance of a gas leak at your meter is incredibly high, and you don’t want that to be indoors if it happens.

 

What utilities are absolutely essential?

 

When you start to turn on your utilities when you move, you will be required to turn on the electricity, your form of heat, and water/sewer services. Your municipality may also include trash as a part of your water and sewer bills. Non-essentials can include internet, telephone, cable, and any other services that aren’t necessary for health and wellness.